This is Horror, Issue 25: Nightmare on Elm Street, The Invasive, and The Ghost Club

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This is Horror, Issue 25 is a sampling of Horror News, including book and movie releases, and more. A little bit of everything to make the horror hound in you feel all fuzzy and warm. Or tingle with anticipation. Whatever works for you.

This is Horror’s Weekly Quote

“I have seen the dark universe yawning
Where the black planets roll without aim,
Where they roll in their horror unheeded,
Without knowledge, or lustre, or name.” 
― H.P. LovecraftNemesis

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Horror Movies

Let’s face it, it’s the last two weeks of the year. Horror is squelched right now.  So, instead, I present four of my favorite scenes from the Nightmare on Elm Street films. These films are single-handedly responsible for most of my night terrors as a child. (And yes, I had actual night terrors, to the point they medicated me.)

Nightmare on Elm Street - Suspended by Veins
This one is perhaps the least scary – it never gave me any nightmares, but it just deeply disturbed me. The look on the guys face, the fact that its his – what – arteries? No thanks!
Nightmare on Elm Street - Claw in the Bathtub
Y’all, I still can’t keep my eyes closed for very long in the bath tub. Seriously.
Nightmare on Elm Street - Pushing Wall
The only reason this one doesn’t still creep me out is we no longer live in a place that has wallpaper. And yes, that’s the way my mind works. Freddy can push through wallpaper, but not actual walls.
Nightmare on Elm Street - Waterbed
After I watched this movie, I went to spend the night at a friend’s house, and she had a waterbed. It took every speck of bravery I had in me not to call my mom and ask for her to come pick me up.

Oh, in case you missed it, if you’re interested in how the Nightmare on Elm Street movies did, you can check it out in our handy little infographic.

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Horror Books

Featured New Release

Book cover for The Ghost club

The Ghost Club – William Meikle – December 9th, 2017

Writers never really die; their stories live on, to be found again, to be told again, to scare again.

In Victorian London, a select group of writers, led by Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker and Henry James held an informal dining club, the price of entry to which was the telling of a story by each invited guest.

These are their stories, containing tales of revenant loved ones, lost cities, weird science, spectral appearances and mysteries in the fog of the old city, all told by some of the foremost writers of the day. In here you’ll find Verne and Wells, Tolstoy and Checkov, Stevenson and Oliphant, Kipling, Twain, Haggard and Blavatsky alongside their hosts.

Come, join us for dinner and a story:

Robert Louis Stevenson – Wee Davie Makes a Friend Rudyard Kipling – The High Bungalow Leo Tolstoy – The Immortal Memory Bram Stoker – The House of the Dead Mark Twain – Once a Jackass Herbert George Wells – Farside Margaret Oliphant – To the Manor Born Oscar Wilde – The Angry Ghost Henry Rider Haggard – The Black Ziggurat Helena P Blavatsky – Born of Ether Henry James – The Scrimshaw Set Anton Checkov – At the Molenzki Junction Jules Verne – To the Moon and Beyond Arthur Conan Doyle – The Curious Affair on the Embankment

Proudly represented by Crystal Lake Publishing—Tales from the Darkest Depths

Gracie’s review.

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Goodreads Horror Giveaways

Book cover for The Invasive Book cover for Horror Everywhere Book cover for The Zee Brothers, Zombie Exterminators

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Horrorific Trivia

Going with Lilyn’s Nightmare on Elm Street scenes I was going to drop in my favorite ludicrous deaths. But then, I remembered that the eighties was the birth of tie-in merchandise and A Nightmare on Elm Street was not exempt from this madness for merch. So, my friends and fellow horror lovers, I present to you some of the weirdest, most ridiculous movie tie-ins for A Nightmare on Elm Street:

The Freddy Toaster: What better way to start your day than with a famed murderer! That’s right, you can now, literally, eat Freddy. I guess that serves him right for eating the People Pizza.

 

Call 1-900-Freddy: Feeling lonely? Wanna talk to someone you can really spill your guts to? Never fear, while you’re staying awake, chugging your coffee and No-Doz you can always call 1-900-909-FRED and for two dollars a minute you can have a pre-recorded heart to heart with Freddy himself.

Freddy Krueger’s Tales of Terror: A book tie-in to a movie isn’t so strange. In fact, I have a Freddy book myself. I feel like the concept for this series went a little something like this: “Let’s see, R.L. Stine is having a lot of success with his Fear Street series why don’t we do a series? We’ll aim it at teenagers and get the crappiest Fred Krueger make-up we can find and slap it on the cover. Gold!” Honestly, I don’t know if they’re good or not (and I’d love to find one to see) but the covers are so Nineties Neon I can’t help but giggle.

A Nightmare on Elm Street Nintendo Game: Freddy has been popping up here and there as a special guest in various horror games lately. However, once upon a time Freddy had his very own Nintendo game. It started out as you being able to play as Freddy but that was scrapped, presumably for fear of backlash. This was before Manhunt and GTA, after all. In concept it sounds at least somewhat close to how a real Freddy movie would play out. You play as a teen with up to three other players (using the NES Four Score). Your goal is to collect Freddy’s bones scattered around. It also had a Sleep Meter that would go down and when it ran out you would be warped to the Dream World where you could get killed by Freddy that much the quicker. Despite some…odd choices of enemies (like minotaurs) and weapons. Apparently shurikens became very popular in Springwood.

A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010): Why?? Just why?? I know, I know. It’s not a tie-in but, I ask again, why was this necessary?

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Horror on the Web

Check out this very interesting article on how horror movies can help anxiety and why on Broadly.

While we couldn’t score an interview with William Meikle on his new book The Ghost Club gingernutsofhorror.com did

Well, this sounds interesting…and terrifying. Insidious: The Last Key will be trying something a little more high-tech with it’s new movie. Check it out at Bloody Disgusting

Have a happy Ash-filled holiday (with or without chainsaw)

4 thoughts on “This is Horror, Issue 25: Nightmare on Elm Street, The Invasive, and The Ghost Club

  1. I love this post. I still consider the original NOES to be the best horror movie made. I love the nostalgic Freddy tributes too.

    I have the NOES DVD Box set and went to play the DVD game the other day…but sadly discovered it is not supported on Windows 10 >:(

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