Twilight Zone Tuesday – The Purple Testament

The Purple Testament

Lt. William Fitzgerald – William Reynolds
Capt. Phil Riker – Dick York
Capt. Gunther – Barney Phillips
Smitty – Michael Vandever

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Twilight Zone Tuesdays – The Last Flight

The Last Flight

Lt. William Terrence Decker – Kenneth Haigh
Major General George Harper – Alexander Scourby
Major Wilson – Simon Scott
A.V.M. Alexander “Leadbottom” MacKaye, R.A.F. – Robert Warwick

Panning down from the Twilight Zone intro we pan down to see a fashionable guy in a scarf piloting a bi-plane.

Serling:
Witness Flight Leftenant William Terrence Decker, Royal Flying Corps, returning from a patrol somewhere over France. The year is 1917. The problem is that the lieutenant is hopelessly lost. Leftenant Decker will soon discover that a man can be lost not only in terms of maps and miles, but also in time. And time in this case can be measured in eternities.

During Serling’s monologue Lieutenant Decker seems to be lost in a fog and lands at an airport next to an Air Force jet. Then we see a sign that says ‘Welcome to Lafayette Air Base – Reims, France’. I’m guessing our pilot lost his way all the way to (Twilight Zone) present day. Guys with jeeps and guns hurry to the tarmac to scope out the intruder. He pulls over and they ask him to exit the aircraft. Guy in Charge wants to know where he’s from and asks what he means by landing his ‘antique’ on the runway. The pilot tells them that he’s English and he’s surprised by the base, he had no idea America was so advanced in their Air Force. They escort him to the Administration Building and to see Major General George Harper.

Lt. Decker approaches the desk and M.G. Harper wants to know what’s up. The escort says that Lt. Decker just landed his ‘ship’ there and starts to tell George Harper what exactly his ‘ship’ was. Does the Air Force really call planes ships? M.G. Harper asks who he is and Decker introduces himself as Second Leftenant, William Terrence Decker, sir, Royal Flying Corps.

Harper wants to know if there’s an air show in town but Decker doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Then Harper wants to know if they’re making a film and why he’s in that costume. Decker replies that it’s his uniform. Harper doesn’t really know what to make of the guy. Decker wants to know where he is and Harper comes back with “Where do you think you are?”

Decker says he thought he was landing at 56 Squadron, RFC. The escort looks confused and says that was…somewhere. He trails off. Then he asks Decker what the date is. Decker replies that it’s March the 5th, 1917. They don’t believe him but he insists it is. They tell him it’s March the 5th, 1959. We get a zoom-in on Decker’s somewhat surprised face. They don’ believe him but Decker swears it’s true. He is rather shocked as well. Decker goes to the window and sees some jet planes which throws him for a loop. He sees the big cloud he was passing through and says that it was like being swallowed by a vacuum. Decker a;so says that the same thing happened to another pilot, he just disappeared while flying.

They, somewhat understandably, don’t believe him. Why he would be messing with them is another matter. Why on Earth would someone land a Bi-Plane on an Air Force runway for a prank?

Decker says that he and Mac were on the same squadron…but here Harper interrupts him saying, “Captain Mackaye, Captain Alexander Mackaye?” Because there’s only one guy nicknamed Mac in the entire world, I guess. Decker wants to know how Harper knows Mac and Harper is now even more suspicious because Air Vice Marshall Alexander MacKaye is on his way there now for a base inspection. Decker says that’s impossible because Alexander Mackaye is dead.

Next scene Harper and Escort Guy are checking out Decker’s belongings. Escort Guy says it’s ingenious. That everything could be checked on. Harper doesn’t want to waste the time. Escort Guy says that if it’s a hoax then it’s certainly an elaborate one. Harper wants to know what he means by ‘if’. I get that it’s hard to believe but again, why?? What would be the point? Remember, this is in the era before security was insanely tight just at airports. Harper is suspicious because he thinks it has something to do with MacKaye.

The other Major who somewhat believes Decker goes back to see him. Decker wants to know why he’s being kept prisoner there. The Major replies that he’s not exactly a prisoner there but Decker says it’s pretty much the same thing. They’re not letting him leave which is the same thing. The Major wants to know why Decker’s so afraid of seeing MacKaye. Decker protests that he’s not afraid of seeing Mac or anything else. Methinks he doth protest too much. Finally he says fine, he’ll see him. The Major (who they still haven’t named) asks again about the cloud. Decker says that he’s told the Major everything he knows.

The Major says that pilots from 1917 don’t just land on Air Force bases in 1959 every day. Decker says that it happened today, tells the Major to leave him alone, he already said he’d see Mac. Major asks if Decker really knows Mac. Decker says of course he does. Decker used to call him Old Leadbottom because he took some German gunfire to the booty during a fly-over. Hence the nickname Old Leadbottom. It was a private joke and being proud, Mac wouldn’t like it if he knew Decker bruited it about.

Major wants to know why Decker’s so sure that Mac is dead. Decker says the last time he saw Mac he was surrounded by seven German planes. Decker claims that he couldn’t do anything about it because he was involved with three other planes at the time. The Major says Mac must have survived because he went on to become one of the biggest Blitz heroes and, obviously, is alive in their time. Decker doesn’t see how it could be possible. During the Second World War. Won a lot of medals and such. Big hero, long story short.

Decker freaks out and tries to make a run for it. They get him before he gets out the door. The Major wants to know what’s wrong and Decker says that he can’t see Mac. The Major wants to know why not. Decker yells because he’s a coward! Decker, not Mac.

He says he’s a coward and always has been. Trying to pretend to be a hero. That’s how he got lost in the cloud, he was trying to run away. He prattles on a bit about boys laughing and joking and turning into ice-cold killers in the sky. But not him. He and Mac were supposed to go on patrols together but Decker usually talked him into splitting up. Mac would hope to run into trouble but Decker would linger in the clouds. He thought about giving himself up because pilots get the best treatment (is that true?) but he was too chicken to do that, even. He couldn’t bear to be discredited. He’s actually even fired shots through his plane to make it look like he’d run into trouble. Major says it’s no crime to be afraid and Mac would understand.

 

Decker says he won’t because he ditched Mac and left him to die. The Major says he must not have because he’s coming that day. This makes Decker look up. He begins to beg the Major to let him go. To let him go back in time or Mac won’t be alive to come there. The Major thinks he’s crazy but Decker isn’t giving him long to think it over. Decker decks the Major and takes off for his plane. Decker gets his plane started and tries to take off. The Major catches up to him but Decker insists and the Major lets him fly off into the wild blue yonder.

 

Back at the Air Force Base Harper wonders why Major let him go. The MacKaye we’ve been hearing so much of finally arrives. They ask him about Decker and he says, yes, he knew him. During that dogfight he thought Decker was ditching him. But then he dropped down out of nowhere and saved him. Decker was killed. Harper asks if his personal effects were sent back and Mac says no, they couldn’t find them. Harper shows him the effects they gathered from Decker when he was there. Mac recognizes them, thus proving it was really Decker that was there. The Major has a little giggle to himself over the Leadbottom nickname which Mac recognizes.

Serling:
Dialogue from a play, Hamlet to Horatio: “There are more things in Heaven and Earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” Dialogue from a play written long before men took to the sky. There are more things in Heaven and Earth and in the sky, that perhaps can be dreamt of. And somewhere in between Heaven, The Sky, The Earth lies the Twilight Zone.

Twilight Zone Tuesday – The Fever

The Fever

The Fever Season One – Episode 17

Franklin Gibbs – Everett Sloane
Flora Gibbs – Vivi Janiss
Narrator – Rod Serling

There’s enough neon signs to let us know that yes, indeed, we are in Las Vegas. Let’s see, a roulette wheel, dice, cigarette girl, yup, it is a casino. Two suits from the casino approach a couple whom they call Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs. First Suit asks if they’re enjoying themselves and their room. First Suit says that it’s not every day they have ‘celebrated contest winners’. Second Suit chimes in with “no, just every other day” The Mrs. seems excited to be there but her husband (who looks quite a bit older than her) looks less than thrilled. Second Suit is the photographer for the casino and wants to get a picture for the Gibbs’ hometown newspaper. First Suit says he’ll get the picture off to the Elgin Bugle right away. he tells the Gibbs to enjoy themselves and remember they have unlimited credit. Mr. Gibbs still looks grouchy and First Suit walks away.

Serling:
Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs. 3 Days and 2 nights, all expenses paid at a Las Vegas hotel, won by Mrs. Gibbs’ knack with a phrase. Unbeknownst to either Mr. or Mrs. Gibbs is the fact that there’s a prize in that package neither expected nor bargained for. In just a moment one of them will succumb to an illness worse than any virus can produce. A most inoperative, deadly, life-shattering affliction known as “The Fever”.

Mrs. Gibbs is extremely excited to be there. “There’s such a flavor to the place!” Her words, not mine. Mr. Gibbs basically tells her to cram her flavor, he hates it there. He tells her she knows how he feels about gambling. Flora says it’s different there but Franklin disagrees. Gambling is gambling and it’s an immoral den of iniquity. I’m paraphrasing a bit. He tells Flora that it’s her vacation, she won it. But he’s going to do his damndest to make sure she doesn’t enjoy it.

Flora tells him to try and enjoy it if he can. A lady wins the hundred grand jackpot and they bring it to her a nice big bowl of cash. Ok, I don’t know casino history but did they really do that? It seems a little unsafe to me. Flora eyeballs the Super Jackpot machine. Bad idea Flora. It just paid out. Then a different machine catches her eye. She has the temerity to put a nickel in the machine and Franklin freaks out, snatching her arm away. He says she might as well throw them away. Dude, chill. It’s a freaking nickel. Then he reams her out because she was an idiot and won a contest for the three days and nights that he’s wasting by being there all because she’s silly enough to want to have fun. It seems he was only good with it because it didn’t cost them anything but now that she’s spending actual money, a whole nickel! Well! He just won’t stand for that! Flora honey, cut your losses now.

He’s chewing her out in front of everyone like the douche chugger he is. She tries to calm him down by promising not to play anymore. Then she points out that the nickel is already in it so he ‘lets’ her pull the arm. Damn, it seems like your arm would get tired pulling those things. Which is probably why they switched to buttons on the electronic ones. Don’t want the gamblers getting tired and walking away. It doesn’t win and she jokes that she’s unlucky. Franklin decides he’s had enough of all of this debauchery and leaves to go back to their room.

On the way a drunk guy grabs Franklin, shoves a dollar in his hand and totters off. They’re definitely bigger than a quarter. Franklin gets tempted by a nearby slot machine so he gives it a try with encouraging looks from Flora. He yanks the arm and wins some coins. Franklin says that’s the difference between his intelligence and all the other crazy fools there. They’re going to take their loot and go home with it. Because they’re Baboons but the Gibbs are not. He decides to go off to have a shave before dinner. The drunk guy comes back and feeds another dollar into the machine Franklin just left, seemingly proving his point. But, since we know we’re in the Twilight Zone, things are going to get shaky for the Gibbs.

A freaky voice starts calling Franklin’s name. Ah, the siren call of the slot machines. Although it’s definitely not a nice voice. It’s harsh and rather annoying. In the hotel room Flora is fast asleep and Franklin is eyeballing the stack of dollars. He gets up all sneaky and grabs the stack. Flora turns the lights on and wants to know what Franklin is doing. Franklin says he wants to go get rid of the money. It’s tainted, immoral money and he wants to get rid of it. Whatever Franklin. First you’re a total douche canoe to your wife, in front of everyone, because she wanted to try a nickel machine. Now you’re making excuses to go lose $15 – $20 dollars. I’m thinking it’s Franklin that gets The Fever.

Flora follows him down and says it’s awfully late. Franklin ignores her. He promptly loses the dollars to the machine. He gets some money from the window, already sweating like a baboon. My apologies to the simians. I’d rather hang out with a monkey than Franklin. And I hate those poop-throwing little things. Flora tries to gently pull him away and he bites her head off asking her to kindly shut her mouth. Because he hates shrews that give him miserable luck. he says the slot machines are “inhuman” for letting you win a little and then taking it back. Well, yes, Franklin, machines are generally inhuman. And they don’t make you play. You’ve got legs, you can walk away and the machine won’t follow you.

Five hours later he’s still there. Flora tries to pull him away again but he tells her to leave him alone. I’m telling you Flora, cut your losses. The guys at the cage have a little conversation about him saying “when they get hooked, they get really hooked.” There’s a montage of Franklin using the machine and getting more money out to feed the machine. It’s the next morning and Flora tries to pull him away, again.

There’s more montage of him so we have no idea how much longer it has been. It appears to at least be a day or two. He puts his last dollar in but the machine’s arm jams. He yanks on the arm for a while and then just straight up attacks it. He wants his damn dollar back. They drag him off and says that he’s going to need a doctor. Two casino people prop it back up and hang an ‘Out of Order’ sign on it.

Franklin is upstairs in bed, wide awake and tortured by the machine calling his name. He blames the machine for breaking down so it didn’t have to pay out. He says it’s not a machine but an entity with a will of it’s own. He keeps babbling about that and his last silver dollar. He keeps hearing it calling him. “Franklin!”

He goes to leave the hotel room but “Aaahhh!” The evil slot machine is there! Guess I was wrong, it did grow legs and follow him. He slams the door and runs to the other side of the room. The Evil Machine follows him in and Franklin starts freaking out. Flora tells him there’s nothing there. Franklin backs away from it and falls. The doctor, police officer and cop have a little moralizing over the body. The Evil Slot Machine spits out Franklin’s last silver dollar at him.

Serling:
Mr. Franklin Gibbs, visitor to Las Vegas, who lost his money, his reason and finally, his life to an inanimate metal machine. Variously described as a one-armed bandit, a slot machine, or in Mr. Franklin Gibbs’ words – a monster with a will all it’s own, for our purposes we’ll stick with the latter definition because we’re in the Twilight Zone.


I really, really hate this episode. Franklin’s an ass and the constant “Franklin!” is really annoying. Not much to really say about it.


Please join us again for next week’s episode: The Last Flight (which is much, much better).

Twilight Zone Tuesday – The Hitch-Hiker

The Hitch-Hiker

Nan Adams – Inger Stevens
The Hitch-Hiker – Leonard Strong
Sailor – Adam Williams
Mechanic – Lew Gallo
Counterman – Russ Bender
Gas Station Man (a.k.a. Mean Old Bastard) – George Mitchell

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Twilight Zone Tuesday – I Shot An Arrow Into The Air

I Shot An Arrow Into The Air

Colonel Bob Donlin – Edward Binns
Corey – Dewey Martin
Pierson – Ted Otis

Trigger Warnings (highlight to see): Images of dead bodies (in the show and in this post), someone getting shot and a murder with a rock (offscreen) 

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Twilight Zone Tuesday – Third from the Sun

Third from the Sun

William Sturka – Fritz Weaving
Eve Sturka – Lori March
Jody Sturka – Denise Alexander
Jerry Riden – Joe Maross
Ann Riden – Jeanne Evans
Carling – Edward Andrews
Narrator – Rod Serling

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Twilight Zone Tuesday – The Four Of Us Are Dying

The Four Of Us Are Dying

Arch Hammer – Harry Townes
Virge Sterig – Phillip Pine
Johnny Foster – Ross Martin
Andy Marshak – Don Gordon
Penell – Berard Fein
Mr. Marshak – Peter Brocco
Detective – Milton Frome
Maggie – Beverly Garland

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Twilight Zone Tuesday – What You Need

What You Need

What You Need Original Air Date: 12/25/1959

Fred Renard – Steve Cochran
Pedott – Ernest Truex
Lefty – Read Morgan
Girl in Bar – Arlene Martel

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Twilight Zone Tuesday – Judgement Night

Twilight Zone Tuesday – Judgement Night

Carl Lanser – Nehemiah Persoff
Captain Wilbur – Ben Wright
Miss Barbara Stanley – Deirdre Owens
Major Devereaux – Leslie Bradley
Potter – Hugh Sanders
First Officer McLeod – Patrick McNee
Lt. Mueller – James Franciscus
Narrator – Rod Serling

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Twilight Zone Tuesday – Perchance to Dream

Perchance to Dream

 

 

Edward Hall – Richard Conte
Dr. Eliot Rathmann – John Larch
Maya/Miss Thompson – Suzanne Lloyd
Narrator – Rod Serling
Written by Charles Beaumont


Highlight to see Trigger Warnings: Jump-scares in a fun house, a man jumps out of a window, effectively committing suicide in a dream. A body on a couch. End Spoiler.


We open on a zoomy freaky PoV shot of a very tall office building. Soon we see the man who’s point of view we are sharing.

Serling:
12:00 noon, an ordinary scene, an ordinary city, lunchtime for thousands of ordinary people. To most of them this hour will be a rest, a pleasant break in the day’s routine. To most, but not all. To Edward Hall, time is an enemy. And the hour to come is a matter of life and death.

Edward Hall looks like he’s working up his nerve to enter through the scary revolving door. Can’t say I blame him, those things are freaky. Only slightly less freaky than escalators. Finally he peels himself off the pillar he’s on, only to lean against the wall of the building. Well, that’s progress, I guess. Eddie finally makes his way through the revolving door.

He goes to door 1410 Eliot Rathmann M.D. He goes through the reception area into the doctor’s office, after he takes a good long look at the receptionist.

Eddie oozes into Dr. Elliot office and leans on a desk, the doctor thinks Eddie is ill but he says “No, I’m just tired.” Dr. Eliot says Eddie needs to rest and leads Eddie over to one of those famous leather couches. I’m curious, do psychiatrists actually use those? Eddie closes his eyes for a moment. Things get a little dimmer. They brighten back up though as he pops up from the couch. Dr. Eliot wants to know if Eddie’s so tired then why doesn’t he lay down. Edward says he is tired, he’s been up for 87 hours. Almost 4 days.

Dr. Eliot asks why Eddie can’t go to sleep and Eddie says that it’s not that he can’t, it’s that he mustn’t. If he falls asleep he’ll never wake up. And we actually get the DUN DUN DUNNN music!

When the lights fade up again the doctor is lighting Eddie’s cigarette for him. Eddie wants to walk around so he doesn’t fall asleep. Dr. Eliot tells him to stand on his head if he thinks it will help. Eddie thinks he’s a strange sort of psychiatrist. Dr. Eliot chuckles and asks what Eddie expected, Sigmund Freud? He says he’s thought of wearing  disguise and puts on a pair of glasses.

Eddie doesn’t think the psychiatrist can help him and says he only came to see the psychiatrist because his regular doctor suggested it. Eddie wants to leave and Dr. Eliot says to do as he pleases. Eddie wants to know if Dr. Eliot promises not to put him in a strait-jacket but the psychiatrist promises nothing. He’s actually pretty funny. Eddie wanders over to the window to look at a very nicely painted city scene. He opens the window and looks down at the drop. I think it’s weird that  the window of a psychiatrist’s office would even open or be made of real glass.

Dr. Eliot pulls him back in and closes the windows. Eddie’s amused and says he just wanted some air. He wants to know if the doctor thought he was going to jump. Dr. Eliot says he doesn’t know, hence the need for caution. Eddie says there’s not a chance of that. Dr. Eliot tells him to start from the beginning and now we finally get to why Eddie is at the psychiatrist’s office.

Eddie looks at a painting of a ship on the wall. He wants to know if the doctor has ever really looked at it. Eddie says he can make it move. At least, for him. He starts telling the doctor about having a picture similar to the picture of the ship at his home when he was younger. Eddie’s mother told him to watch it long enough and it would move. Which seems a little mean but before TV mom’s did what they could to keep their kids amused.

One evening it did move. He realized that it was just an optical illusion but after a while he couldn’t control it. Every time he would look at the painting it would seem to move. Even though he knows it’s an optical illusion it still terrifies him. A boat moving terrifies him? Mmmkay.

Eddie pops a few uppers and the Dr. Eliot wants to know if that’s how he’s staying awake. He also washes it down with some of the doc’s water (that I thought was brandy at first. While smoking a cigarette that Dr. Eliot helpfully lit for him. Damn, they were hardcore back then. After everything he’s just downed he says he has had a rheumatic heart since the age of 15. I’m sure those uppers and smokes will do that rheumatic heart real good there.

He was ordered by his general physician to be calm and relaxed. No strenuous exercise, no long walks, no stairs, no shocks. especially no shocks. They forgot about his imagination that he apparently has no control over. At all.

When he read about a woman being killed by a murderer who hid in her backseat (which sounds like something he heard from a friend of a friend) that freaked him out. He imagined the murderer in his own backseat. So much so that he crashed his car. Eddie says that his doctor told him one more shock would kill him.

Dr. Eliot wants to know if there has been another shock. Um, I’m pretty sure he hasn’t doctor because he’s alive and in your office. Eddie does say, however, that there will be, the next time he goes to sleep and it will kill him.

Eddie starts talking about his dreams and how he always dreams in sequence, like the old movie serials. He hasn’t dreamed in a while. That is, until a few weeks ago. We get an awesomely thrilling detailed description of his night and how he fell asleep.

Dreamland:
Eddie suddenly finds himself in an amusement park. It’s very real and detailed but also very disturbing, twisted and dark.
He’s looking at a Ferris Wheel, a creepy carousel. Eddie’s shooting at a big swirly thing trying to win one of those terrifying Kewpie Dolls. Who the hell would want one of those things? They rank right up there with Troll dolls on the creepy scale.

Don’t Worry. I’m Just Here to Steal Your Soul. It Won’t Hurt…Much

 

Come…Join the Cult. Just Look Deep Into Our Soulless Gaze

 

Anyways, Eddie gets distracted by a dancer named Maya the Cat Girl. So he ditches the Kewpie Doll (wise decision) to go check out the Cat Girl. Maya does a very awkward ‘cat dance’ that is out of rhythm with the drum-beats.

She shows some fifties risque leg (they are very nice legs though) She starts twirling and he gets scared and runs away. She laughs an evilly brunette laugh at him.

They might be pushing the G – Rating a bit thigh high with thhis one

Eddie says he doesn’t know who she is (duh, she’s Maya the Cat Girl). He’s drawn to her but also repelled by her. He goes to light a dream-cigarette but finds out the random arm lighting his cigarette belongs to Maya. She wants to know why he ran away. They have some flirty talk while they share a smoke. Well, not share, exactly. She plucks it out of his mouth which is supposed to be sexy, I guess.

She wants Eddie to come with her but he’s scared to. Because of her cat eyes. Which are kind of scary because she went a little crazy with the eye-liner. She asks him if he’s afraid and he says no because it’s a dream. She then invites him to come…and I’ll just back away from that one.

He rudely drops his cigarette, littering his dream carnival. She wants to go in the fun house which she says is cool, dark ad soft. He foolishly follows her into the ‘fun house’ that looks more like a cheap haunted house and it doesn’t look that fun. Or that scary, really. They share a smoochie but are rudely interrupted by a scream and a gorilla-bigfoot thing. Eddie runs off while Maya evilly laughs again.

Office:
Back in the office Eddie is telling Dr. Eliot that he’s sure Maya is trying to kill him. He woke up with his heart beating fast (I’ll bet) and he had to lie still for an hour until it settled down. Dr. Eliot asks if Eddie knew her. Which he literally just said he didn’t, I’m starting to wonder about this doctor. Eddie says that she looks vaguely familiar but doesn’t really recognize her.

Dreamland:
The dream is out of control now and Eddie’s running. Maya is close behind and taunting him with the fact it’s only a dream and he can do whatever he wants to in his dream. She lures him onto a roller-coaster using strong-arm tactics like, you know, asking. He doesn’t want to go but he’s helpless against her sequins. So they get on the coaster Maya is chuckling (and to be honest her voice and laugh is pretty creepy). He wants to stop the coaster but they can’t and he keeps saying he wants out. So, reasonably enough, she tells him to jump off the coaster. Sounds legit.

Office:
We’re in a slightly terrifying close-up of Eddie’s face. Basically he’s in a damned if you do, damned if you don’t situation. If he falls asleep she’ll reach him and push him off (I guess safety harnesses weren’t a thing in the fifties) but if he stays awake any longer then the strain will be too much and his heart will give out. Eddie thinks the doctor can’t help him and goes to leave. Eddie steps out into the lobby but sees the receptionist. Eeek! It’s Maya! Receptionist Maya this time, not Cat Girl Maya. He freaks out and runs back into the doctor’s office. Dr. Eliot wants to know what is the matter. Eddie says it’s her, it’s Maya the Cat Girl. Dr. Eliot says that the receptionist isn’t named Maya. Eddie says to himself “I’m not letting her take me alive!” And jumps out of a window. Makes sense. I guess. Eddie plummets to the sidewalk. I guess it wasn’t until later that the unbreakable windows caught on.

Back to the doctor, he is sitting at his desk and looking thoughtful. He calls his receptionist (Miss Thomas) in. Eddie is dead on the couch. Dr. Eliot checks his pulse. I’m not really sure why he wanted the receptionist to come look at the dead guy on his couch. Miss Thomas says he just came in a few seconds ago. Dr. Eliot says Eddie came in, laid down and in two seconds was asleep. (Remember the ominous dimming?)
Dr. Eliot says that Eddie screamed and died. They guess it was a heart attack. Well, I guess they’re not going to bother with resuscitation or an ambulance or pesky little details like that. Dr. Eliot thinks it was a good way to go at least, peacefully in his sleep. I think Eddie would disagree.

Serling:
They say a dream takes only a second or so. And yet in that second a man can live a lifetime. He can suffer and die and who’s to say which is the greater reality. The one we know? Or the one in dreams. Between heaven, the sky, the earth, in the Twilight zone.


As you can tell this one was good but I just couldn’t help poking fun at it every once in a while. It does have a wavering air of reality and unreality. Such as Miss Thomas/Maya. When Edward first enters the building he takes a good long look at her and it doesn’t seem to bother him overly much. As he’s “leaving” though, he suddenly seems to realize that she looks just like Maya. And is the personality of the doctor really so flip or is that just what Edward’s mind conjured up? It certainly raises some interesting questions.


Join me again for next week’s Twilight Zone Tuesday – Judgement Night. A great episode with a bit more of a serious bent to it. I’m looking forward to ‘watching’ it with you guys!