Horrors – A Full Year of Horror #46

Horrors! 365 Scary Stories – A Full Year of Horror

11/25/2017 – 12/01/2017

The horror short-short isn’t easy to master, but more than 100 of the genre’s critically acclaimed authors & hottest up-&-comers have taken a stab at it in Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, an anthology that contains a short tale for every day of the year. Steve Rasnic Tem, Wm F. Nolan, Tom Piccirilli, Yvonne Navarro, Peter Atkins, Brian Hodge, Martin Mundt & 166 others give you short, sharp shocks.

If you missed the first post you can find it here.

We’re getting to the end of the year. While I have enjoyed sharing these wonderful stories with you guys, I’m also very excited to get a new project started that I hope you’re going to love! I’m also flattered and so happy you all have been following along with me for this long. It’s made me very happy. Ok, ok, enough with the gushiness, my fellow ghouls. Let’s get on with the gore-fests!


Trigger MomentYvonne Navarro

Synopsis:
After decorating for her Halloween party Ellen wants nothing more than a brain-numbing, seasonally appropriate movie. Afterwards, though, began the dream. A dream where a creature is stalking her with a deadly implacability. But it’s just a dream, right? And she’s sure the young man her mother introduces her to is only in costume. They can’t be real claws, right?

Review:
A good story with a slasher movie feel. I was wondering about the strange doors she can reach over. I thought for sure it was going to be a movie screen and she was in a horror movie.


TunnelAnne Bishop

Synopsis:
She doesn’t like driving through tunnels. They’re dark and she gets panicky. At least he can see the light up ahead. Until the tunnel starts to close in on the car. And then her.

Review:
A very good, claustrophobia inducing story. Tunnels freak me out a bit, too. Bridges even more.


Twelve All HallowsLou Kemp

Synopsis:
For twelve All Hallows Margaret has been meeting Glenna. For twelve All Hallows her father doesn’t know. On this twelfth All Hallows, Glenna will have her revenge.

Review:
I love a good ghostly revenge story. It puts me in mind of the traditional murder ballads.


Two Shades, Hearts in ShadowsMichael Scott Bricker

Synopsis:
A knight, dusted down to bone searches endlessly for Eldorado. In his quest he meets his creator, Poe. And they ride, boldly ride, together. Forever.

Review:
I liked it but I was confused as to why Poe was referenced. Did he do a story about a knight? I will admit to not having read every single story of his so if there is one please let me know!


Unfinished JourneyHugh B. Cave

Synopsis:
The next-door neighbor, Henry keeps having the same dream. A dark alley, a long walk through the street where dark shapes lurk in doorways. But Henry always wakes up before the dream ends. So when the doctor gives him a prescription to help him sleep, enabling to finish the dream and leave the alley Henry decides to try it. What could go wrong?

Review:
Somewhat peculiar and I was a bit disappointed in the more mundane monsters. And I wasn’t sure how to read the doctor, exactly. It seemed he was complicit in the dreams but how?


Until the Next TrainBenjamin Adams

Synopsis:
Jourgenson has been battling an unseen tagger. Every morning Jourgenson awakes to the name ‘Malo’ tagged on his shop and every day he washes it away. On this day Jourgenson realizes that the paint is still wet, ‘Malo’ is nearby. He’ll soon wish he weren’t.

Review:
This had a way creepier ending than I was expecting. The ‘Malo’ and his brethren is described as…I don’t want to spoil it for you, but it’s freaking creepy.


Up Our BlockBenjamin Adams

Synopsis:
Jenny wakes up, unhappy to be alive again. She now has an indent in the back of her skull. Blunt force trauma, perhaps. Perhaps she was a nurse…before. Now she’s just a zombie slave. And the family likes it just fine.

Review:
Another by Benjamin Adams. I have to say, he writes in a subtly creepy way that sneaks up on you. Or makes everything normal until the horror slaps you in the face.


Favorite of the Week:
So many good ones this week! It’s hard to decide. The two by Benjamin Adams (Up Our Block and Until the Next Train) have a creepy neighborhood horror that creeps up your spine. Twelve All Hallows by Lou Kemp was a great ghostly revenge story.


Thanks for joining us again this week and be sure to come back next week for more Horrors!

Horrors – A Full Year of Horror #41

Horrors! 365 Scary Stories – A Full Year of Horror

10/14/2017 – 10/20/2017

 

The horror short-short isn’t easy to master, but more than 100 of the genre’s critically acclaimed authors & hottest up-&-comers have taken a stab at it in Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, an anthology that contains a short tale for every day of the year. Steve Rasnic Tem, Wm F. Nolan, Tom Piccirilli, Yvonne Navarro, Peter Atkins, Brian Hodge, Martin Mundt & 166 others give you short, sharp shocks.

If you missed the first post you can find it here.

So did you guys make it through Friday the 13th without any unexpected Jason’s showing up? No offense to the non-stalker, non-Voorhees Jasons out there. For all of you that did, great! For those of you who had unfortunate run-ins with black cats, ladders and umbrellas inside the house may I suggest curling up on the couch with some good horror stories?

 

 

 


Slips of Pink PaperCindie Geddes

Synopsis:
A group of friends hears a rumour. If you sit in a certain booth at a Chinese restaurant the fortune in your fortune cookie will be true. So what could it mean for Larry that his fortune cookie is blank.

Review:
Love this story. I always love creepy fortunes, prophecies, palm readings and the like. The thought of unavoidable fate or destiny creeps me out. There’s not a whole lot of surprise to the end (i mean, really, everyone knows what happens if your fortune is blank) but it’s a good story nonetheless.


SmellBrian McNaughton

Synopsis:
When Wilbur gets bonked on the head he wakes up with an unusual talent. He can smell people. He quickly finds how to use this to his advantage and us the game a bit more. After making a lucrative contract (on the basis of accidentally grabbing someone else’s coat) he learns that he can use other people’s scent to his advantage. Until one evening, just before an important meeting with Lord Cummerbund, he filches a tweed coat from a pub. Not too big of a deal, right? Unless that coat belongs to a murderer.

Review:
A very interesting idea based on how much people are, consciously or subconsciously, influenced by scent. It kind of reminded me of a study where they took couples that had been together for varying lengths of time. Then they had the men remove their shirts and the women would try to choose which one was their partners based on scent alone. The couples that had been together longer were able to do it more consistently than those that had only been together a short period of time.


Smother LoveNancy Kilpatrick

Synopsis:
Marcie is waiting on the porch, waiting for Timothy. Timothy’s mother ‘strongly suggests’ that he not see her. It’s his choice of course…

Review:
Ok. The story is not bad. But I was thinking a lot about this lately. There are a ton of songs about healthy parental love between Mother-Daughter, Father-Daughter, Father-Son but very rarely is there anything about single fathers or healthy Mother-Son relationships. Typically Mother-Son relationships in so many medias are presented as either distant or smothering. And it’s very annoying. Daddy’s Girl is considered generally cute (in a normal way) but Mommy’s Boy has so many negative connotations. Sorry for the rant, it’s been something that has really been nagging me a lot.


The Snow GlobesBenjamin Adams

Synopsis:
Tully and Brian, a London couple, are perusing an antique store, looking for items for their London Americana kitsch store. They are entranced with some lovely snow globes but they are $300 and the owner refuses to break up the set. So Brian decides to be a ‘man’s man’ and use the five finger discount to grab one. Bad idea.

Review:
Meh. Entitled douche snags something he wants but can’t have and pays the price. Can’t say I feel sorry for him at all.


SnowmanDonald R. Burleson

Synopsis:
Roland hates the snow. He also dislikes when the neighborhood kids play on his lawn. Today they seem to be making a snowman and dancing around it. And why would they put these strange marks in the snow? Roland is about to find out.

Review:
I liked it but it seemed a bit unfinished. Why were these kids so ticked at Roland? He didn’t even really chase them out of the yard or anything.


SolsticeLisa Jean Bothell

Synopsis:

Megan’s family has just moved into the house left to them by Megan’s grandmother. Megan’s grandmother wasn’t very nice, it seems, always telling her that the ‘things’ under the bed would get her if she stayed uncovered. but maybe grandma wasn’t trying to scare her but to warn her.

Review:
A little on the meh side. Megan’s age seems to be a bit iffy. I thought she was an adult at first. Then I figured out that she was supposed to be a kid but her age seems to waffle between a precocious 6 and fifteen. Also, not really sure why the title ‘Solstice’.


Someday My Prints Will ComeLawrence Schimel

Synopsis:
Eleanor does cover art for the biggest romance names. Her imagined Prince Charming smolders inside her head and she paints him longingly, jealous of the women she paints onto the covers with him. She decides to try painting him just for herself as an experiment. Unfortunately, the guys on romance covers aren’t exactly gentlemen. So what’s a girl to do when your prince isn’t as ‘princely’ as you thought? The next week she starts painting for horror covers.

Review:
Humorous in a bit of a twisted way. After all, she’s punishing him because he acted in the way that she created him. Either way I do like stories about paintings coming to life and being creepy.


Favorite of the Week:

Definitely Smell by Brian McNaughton. It had an interesting premise to it with an outcome that I didn’t see coming. The stories continue to be good and hopefully stay that way. I’m hoping we get some good ones week after next for Halloween so, fingers crossed.

Top Ten Horror Anthologies – Movies

A banner with the words The Top Ten Tuesday List on it.I love a good horror movie anthology. Although that is a clunky, clunky name for them. They’re pretty much the movie equivalent of a short story collection. Great for when you want just a short movie but also a long one. They can range from ‘creepy as all hell’ to ‘cheesy goodness’. So enjoy the list and maybe find a new, spooky favorite. They seem to have fallen out of favor a bit lately as feature films but I’m counting on the indie film industry to fill the gap.

Movie posters are linked to IMDB and all synopses come from there as well.

 

Black Sabbath

 A trio of atmospheric horror tales about: A woman terrorized in her apartment by phone calls from an escaped prisoner from her past; a Russian count in the early 1800’s who stumbles upon a family in the countryside trying to destroy a particularly vicious line of vampires; and a 1900-era nurse who makes a fateful decision while preparing the corpse of one of her patients – an elderly medium who died during a seance.

Favorite Segment: The Telephone

 

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Creepshow

 An anthology which tells five terrifying tales based on the E.C. horror comic books of the 1950s. Segments are titled: Father’s Day, The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verril, Something to Tide You Over, The Crate and They’re Creeping Up On You

Favorite Segment: Father’s Day  because…this

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Twilight Zone: The Movie

 

Four horror/sci-fi segments directed by four famous directors, each of them being a new version of a classic story from Rod Serling’s landmark television series The Twilight Zone.

Favorite Segment: The re-imagining of the Twilight Zone’s classic “It’s a Good Life”

A bit of trivia. I do like this compilation but I have a hard time watching it knowing what happened with the segment about the bigot who gets a lesson in humility. It’s a good segment, well-written and, though it may be devoid of any Twilight Zone twists, it does touch upon one of Rod Serling’s favored topics. Prejudice. However, a tragic accident that happened on set makes it hard to watch.

In case you’re new to the site, every Tuesday at 6:30 PM EST, I put up a new recap and review of a Twilight Zone episode.

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Nightmares

 Anthology of four horror tales with a supernatural twist based on urban legends. The four ‘Chapters’ are: Topanga, Bishop of Battle, The Benediction, and Night of the Rat

Favorite Segment: The Benediction

Majorly cheesy as the rest of it is, The Benediction is a great segment.

 

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From a Whisper to a Scream

The uncle of an executed murderess relates four stories of his hometown, Oldfield, to a reporter: an elderly man pursues a romance with a younger woman, even to the grave and beyond…a wounded man on the run from creditors is rescued by a backwoods hermit with the secret to eternal life…a glass-eating carny pays the ultimate price for looking for love on the outside…and Civil War soldiers are held captive by a household of orphans with strange intentions for them.

Favorite Segment: A toss up between the glass eating carny and those creepy as all get out Civil War kids. And, of course, I love the wrap-around with Vincent Price. He was way too hard on this movie.

 

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Tales from the Darkside: The Movie

A young boy tells three stories of horror to distract a witch who plans to eat him. The three segments include Lot 249, Cat from Hell, and Lover’s Vow

Favorite Segment: Definitely “Lover’s Vow”. Such a good one!

 

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Tales from the Hood

Four short, moralistic horror vignettes (a la EC Comics) that deal with mostly black characters. The framing story introduces three youths out to pick up a drug shipment at a funeral parlor from the strange director, Mr. Simms. As the three punks wind their way through the parlor, Mr. Simms tells them the last stories of some of his more interesting clients.

Favorite Segment: I really like the wrap-around story and the segment just before the final reveal. The first segment with the little boy also has a great ending.

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Three…Extremes

An Asian cross-cultural trilogy of horror films from accomplished indie directors. The three segments included are Dumplings, Cut and Box

Favorite Segment: Um, Dumplings? Yeeaahh….

 

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Trick ‘r’ Treat 

Five interwoven stories that occur on Halloween: An everyday high school principal has a secret life as a serial killer; a college virgin might have just met the guy for her; a group of teenagers pull a mean prank; a woman who loathes the night has to contend with her holiday-obsessed husband; and a mean old man meets his match with a demonic, supernatural trick-or-treater.

Favorite Segment: Hmm, so many good ones to choose from. If I have to select one it would probably be the woman who hates Halloween and has a run-in with ‘Sam’. I mean, really, who can hate Halloween!?

 

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Tales from the Dead

Tales from The Dead is a Japanese-language anthology feature film of four ghost stories, each one with a unique personality…each frightening in a different way. Some stories involve revenge while others are warnings about appreciating the value of life. Tales From The Dead is four terrifying, original ghost stories in one.

I caught this on Netflix one evening and I am so happy to have found it again.

Favorite Segment: Really, on this one, the wrap-around story is the real star which is rarely the case. But the medium telling the stories is such a charismatic young lady that I always looked forward to seeing her again.

 

 

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I hope you’ve enjoyed the list and will check some out that you may not have heard of before. I know there are quite a few good ones that I have left out. If I left out a favorite of yours or you want to know more about any of them, please, let us know in the comments.

Horrors! A Full Year of Horror #26

Horrors! 365 Scary Stories – A Full Year of Horror

07/01/2017 – 07/07/2017

 

The horror short-short isn’t easy to master, but more than 100 of the genre’s critically acclaimed authors & hottest up-&-comers have taken a stab at it in Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, an anthology that contains a short tale for every day of the year. Steve Rasnic Tem, Wm F. Nolan, Tom Piccirilli, Yvonne Navarro, Peter Atkins, Brian Hodge, Martin Mundt & 166 others give you short, sharp shocks.

If you missed the first post you can find it here.

 

It’s a perfect week! How cool is that? Hopefully pretty cool since things are getting hot this summer.

 

 

 


Lovelocks Brian McNaughton

Synopsis:
Caleb Hopkins is in love with Abishag Barebones but her father doesn’t like him very much. Caleb decides to bind Abishag to him using magic but which witch is the bewitcher?

Review:
A pretty good story and the image of a man ” bumping down the street on his hindquarters” is definitely…different.


MagpieBrian McNaughton

Synopsis:
Dwight likes to steal things, particularly ladies purses. Especially since it gets them to his house for the night. the suspicion falls on an unknown woman who my have lifted the purse. The tables are turned though, when he finds out that this particular lady he’s trying to lure back to his house has lifted his nitro pills. They were in her purse…

Review:
Two stories by the same author right in a row! I don’t think that’s happened before. A pretty enjoyable story with a nicely dark twist of humour at the end. Although her excuse that she didn’t think the pills were important is kind of lame. Most pills that people bother to carry on them usually are important. and nitros in particular are pretty recognizable.


Making it RightBob Stein

Synopsis:
While driving drunk Charlie narrowly manages to not hit a child crossing the road but does hit the little boy’s dog. Despite trying to talk his way out of it the boy insists that Charlie must “make it right”. Charlie thinks the boy wants money but he doesn’t. He just wants Charlie to “make it right”.

Review:
Loved this story. Some people can be very heartless when it comes to accidentally hitting an animal. I like the little boy’s method of making it right.


Mall of the DeadDel Stone Jr.

Synopsis:
When Beverly comes out of the dressing room everyone is dead. She thinks there must be something going on since displays in the mall are broken and even mannequins are scattered amongst the dead bodies. The police arrive as she makes it to the front door and they tell her it’s happening everywhere. The mannequins are getting even.

Review:
This actually gave me the creeps because mannequins creep me out. Although with the weird torso only ones now they wouldn’t get very far.


Many Happy Returns Brian McNaughton

Synopsis:
A man who has lost his wife has moved into a new home. At first he notices strangers appearing and disappearing quickly in the alley. After that he notices a door into his home that’s been bricked up. Coming home one night he sees that the door is ajar and people who have passed away are inviting him in.

Review:
Aaaah! He’s back again! But with a very good story so we’ll let it slide. A little sad but a little hopeful at the same time. I like to think he found his Susan through the doorway.


MemoryMollie L. Burleson

Synopsis:
Impersonal office work really gets under Sarah’s skin. That and air conditioning. Co-workers she feels are whispering behind her back, a boss that is constantly looking over her shoulder so today she decides to quit. And discovers she can’t. The whiff of brimstone reminds her why she’s there and why she’ll always be there.

Review:
I’m so happy I found this story again! I’ve always remembered it and I loved it but since I read a lot of anthologies and collections I could not remember where it came from. That being said I’ve always liked (that might be a strange term, maybe intrigued would be a better word) by the idea of Hell as a personalized thing. As it says right in the story “what bothers one person may not bother another”. So a ‘one size fits all’ Hell never really made sense to me.


The Midwife’s Temptation Michael L. McComas (I don’t usually put trigger warnings before the synopsis but I felt this story deserved a few from the subject matter).

Trigger Warning – Highlight to read: Baby deaths, religious themes in the story and review

Synopsis:
A fallen angel, the fallen angel one can presume, tells a midwife that she has a gift. The gift of fore-telling when a child is born whether he be good or evil. After dispatching the first child that she surely knows is damned the ‘angel’ reappears to her. His advice is to hurry the blessed ones to heaven and the born damned to leave. his argument being that ‘evil done to evil matters not to God’. She believes him and carries her task out with zeal. Soon the witchcraft fever is kindled and they come for her one night. She begs the angel to tell them of the gift he has bestowed upon her. Revealing his true form he tells her he gave her no gift. It was all a lie.

Review:
A very good, very interesting story. The temptation spoken of could be meant to reveal the midwife’s pride in being so singled out and a feeling of power at a time when women had little power or agency of their own. And, if you believe in religion, it could also be a way of testing her faith. Because, according to most religions God does care even for the ones who have strayed so if the midwife had thought about it then the angel’s explanation makes no sense.


Favorite of the Week:
This has been a great week for stories. It’s always hard to choose just one but this week it’s very hard. I loved Memory by Mollie L. Burleson. I also loved The Midwife’s Temptation by Michael L. McComas. Of the three by Brian McNaughton my favorite was Magpie.


Thanks for joining us this week and please come back next week for more spooky stories.

Horrors! A Full Year of Horror – #18

Horrors! 365 Scary Stories – A Full Year of Horror
4/29/2017 – 5/12/2017

The horror short-short isn’t easy to master, but more than 100 of the genre’s critically acclaimed authors & hottest up-&-comers have taken a stab at it in Horrors! 365 Scary Stories, an anthology that contains a short tale for every day of the year. Steve Rasnic Tem, Wm F. Nolan, Tom Piccirilli, Yvonne Navarro, Peter Atkins, Brian Hodge, Martin Mundt & 166 others give you short, sharp shocks.

If you missed the first post you can find it here.

This week’s post will be a little longer as I’m covering two weeks since last week was Lilyn’s awesome post for Cinco de Mayo.

So settle in, buckle up and hang on for the ride!

Continue reading “Horrors! A Full Year of Horror – #18”

Top Ten Lovecraft Mythos Anthologies

A banner with the words The Top Ten Tuesday List on it.Lovecraftian Horror

  Anyone who even barely dips their toes into the dark and bloody pool that is the horror genre has heard the name Lovecraft. With his output at over 150+ short stories, poems, novellas, ghost written stories and fragments it is a staggering body of work.

  Fans could argue amongst themselves about their favorites (personally the Dream Quest series leaves me cold). Non-fans can denigrate his writing as ‘overly hysterical’ and ‘melodramatic’. Even the proclaimed ‘Lovecraft Expert’ S.T. Joshi has some snide things to say about certain of Lovecraft’s works (and the same snarkiness is implied toward the people that do like them). To me, it’s a damn shame that he didn’t know how successful he would become within his own lifetime. Why is that so often the artist’s lot?

  I do think the one thing that almost all horror fans can agree on is his far-reaching influence on the world of horror.  An influence, in fact, that created its own genre: Lovecraftian Horror.


Top Ten Lovecraft Mythos Anthologies

  It’s a genre that sits comfortably on its eldritch throne. A horror to make us feel small in comparison with the cosmos. And whatever could be lurking there, ready to crush us with one well-placed tentacle.

  It is also a genre that can be built upon. Stone after slimy stone, Lovecraft seemed to encourage the building of his worlds with the result being the new generation of Weird Fiction, began on trade pamphlets they made at their own cost and circulated by mailing lists. Now, in the age of the internet, written freely, produced even more cheaply than Lovecraft was able to do and sold to those who devour it hungrily.

  This is a little list I summoned up when the stars were right of some good Lovecraft anthologies and collections with a bonus link or two at the bottom for those interested in reading his works for themselves.

Black Wings of Cthulhu – edited by S.T. Joshi       (series)

So far there are 5 books altogether in this series. It’s probably no big secret that I’m not a huge fan of Joshi. I dislike the tendency he has to consider himself the Official Voice of Lovecraft. I also dislike his tendency to dismiss any horror that isn’t directly related to the Cthulhu Mythos or cosmic in nature. Even in the introduction to this same anthology he casts a barbed compliment at a story that includes Lovecraft as a ghostly character. Saying Lovecraft “Might not appreciated his resurrection as a ghost”. I will admit, though, that he does put together an awesome, well-rounded Lovecraft anthology. While I haven’t read every book in the series (I’ve read 1-3) the ones I have read were a good mix of stories. The quality remained consistent throughout the first three so I can’t imagine they go down. Some directly tied into the Cthulhu Mythos while others had a touch of the Lovecraftian flavor to them.


Lovecraft’s Monsters – edited by Ellen Datlow

Now this one was a bit hit or miss with me but Ellen Datlow usually puts together pretty solid collections and anthologies and what pleases me others may find boring and vice versa. Plus, it has a great cover.


By the Light of a Gibbous MoonScott Jaeger

I have to admit that when I reviewed this on Goodreads it wasn’t a 5 Star read for me. It was a 3 which to me is a solidly entertaining book and not a bad rating in any way. You could see the influences in his stories. Sometimes a bit too much. However, I think that if he keeps writing he’ll find his own voice and niche in the simultaneously small and vast world of Lovecraftian weird fiction.


Lovecraft Unbound – edited by Ellen Datlow

Another great collection put together by Ellen Datlow with an awesome cover.


World War Cthulhu: A Collection of Lovecraftian War Stories – edited by Brian M. Sammons and Glynn Owen Barrass

Has some great stories in it that blend in well with the war theme. Lovecraft and war wouldn’t seem to go together but they do. World War Cthulhu answers the question of what would happen if The Old Ones did break through.


Cthulhu Lies Dreaming: Twenty-three Tales of the Weird and Cosmic – edited by Salome Jones

A great variety of stories in keeping with the arcane unknown that defines Lovecraftian horror. And, again, a beautiful cover to match.


The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft – edited by Aaron J. French

Another very awesome cover. I haven’t read this yet but it has a lot of good reviews behind it. My co-conspirator is reading it right now and so far the verdict is good. The sepia toned illustrations are beautiful looking. This looks like an anthology you might want to invest in the physical book rather than an e-book. It looks absolutely gorgeous.


Searchers After Horror – edited by S.T. Joshi

While not listed exactly as a Lovecraft anthology per se, it’s themes and stories call to mind Lovecraftian tones.


The Cthulhu Mythos Megapack and The Second Cthulhu Mythos MegapackVarious

               

Put out by Wildside Press these volumes contain stories by H.P. Lovecraft. They also contain stories written by contemporaries of Lovecraft that forayed into Cthulhu’s domains. At $1.00 each they’re one heck of a bargain.


Autumn Cthulhu – edited by Mike Davis

Another I haven’t read yet but with enough good reviews to justify it’s inclusion here. In fact, the lower reviews I have read about it mainly complain that most are not directly tied into the Cthulhu Mythos. Reading the description however it’s not marketed as being strictly Cthulhu stories. The synopsis leads me to believe they were going for stories with a Lovecraftian flavor.


Since these next two books are Lovecraft only collections I didn’t want to include them in the main list but they are great collections.

Necronomicon: The Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft

A beautifully bound edition that’s too pretty to read. Which brings me to my next entry…

Complete Collection Of H.P.Lovecraft – 150 eBooks With 100+ Audio Book Links(Complete Collection Of Lovecraft’s Fiction,Juvenilia,Poems,Essays And Collaborations)

 

 

 

 

 

Insanely cheap this is, as of yet, the most complete collection I’ve found of Lovecraft’s stories. The e-book also includes audio readings and teleplays of his works. The audio collection varies in quality but the e-book does not. Arranged and linked beautifully, it’s only $0.99 in the Amazon store. I highly recommend it.


Have I forgotten any? If you have a favorite Lovecraftian anthology that I’ve overlooked please let me know.