Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love Review

Title: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love | Author: Sarah Vaughn | Illustrator: Lan Medina | Publisher: DC | Pub. Date: 2017-6-6 | Pages: 160 | ASIN: B072HXGLHV | Genre: Paranormal Fantasy Graphic Novel | Language: English | Triggers: None | Rating: 3 out of 5 | Source: Received a copy from Netgalley for review consideration.


Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love

Boston Brand is a dead man walking. More than walking, actually—his uncanny abilities enable him to float, fly and seize control of the bodies of the living. He’s no mere ghost. He’s something more powerful, more heroic. He is Deadman! And he’s about to meet Berenice—a living woman with powers of her own.

Berenice’s complicated life and loves have driven her to the haunted halls of the sprawling mansion known as Glencourt Manor. It’s a place where the forces of darkness are known to gather—a house where a person with Berenice’s power to talk to the dead could accomplish great good…or unleash incredible evil.

Separated by the boundary between life and death, yet able to walk between both worlds, Deadman and Berenice must work together to unravel the mystery of the Manor and defeat the dark forces that threaten to erupt. Mystery, murder, resurrection and romance await. The only question is, are their hearts and souls strong enough to survive?

Unlock the answer in DEADMAN: DARK MANSION OF FORBIDDEN LOVE, from acclaimed creators Sarah Vaughn (ALEX + ADA), Lan Medina (FABLES) and José Villarrubia (SWEET TOOTH). This Gothic tale of passion and betrayal is an all-new twist on the character of Boston Brand. Collects DEADMAN: DARK MANSION OF FORBIDDEN LOVE Books #1-3. – Goodreads

Deadman Dark Mansion

Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love Review

I went into Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love completely blind. I had never heard of the character Deadman/Boston Brand before. I don’t think I’ve ever read anything by either the writer or illustrator for this book. So, yeah, completely unfamiliar with all aspects of it.

The art for Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love was simple yet effective. Very straightforwardly illustrated for the most part. It served to make Deadman himself stand out that much more. The color choices went along well with the illustration style. However, one area that gave me a lot of trouble reading Deadman was the white words on the light blue background that relayed the main female character’s internal thoughts. The white on red of Deadman’s was a bit easier. Because I read this as an epub, it was hard to find a ‘just right’ setting that enabled me to easily see the character’s internal thoughts and not have to scroll inch by inch down through the pages. It made for a somewhat uncomfortable reading experience that left me with a minor headache every time I tackled the story. A more clear font might have made a world of difference.

I liked the diverse representation in Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love. Berenice is (appears to be, at least) bi/ possibly pan-sexual, and Sam is non-binary as well as African American. I also appreciated the fact that that Berenice wasn’t your typical model-looking knockout so often found in comic books. She was actually rather plain and dressed in clothes normal women actually wear.

As for the story itself, it was interesting. Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love is sort of a superhero and gothic ghost story mashup. It takes place inside an old mansion that had been closed up for over 150 years. The story is dark with a definite air of mystery to it. The interactions between Brand and Berenice are fun. The twist with one of the other characters caught me by surprise. (It was a good thing, as some of the other elements of the book aren’t exactly subtle.)

Given the headache that I suffered through to finish Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love, I can’t say I’ll ever pick up another volume. However, fans of paranormal fantasy and superhero novels should definitely give Deadman a shot. If it wasn’t for the headache, I would have enjoyed the story a lot more than I did. It’s not the most well-written or meaningful, but it is entertaining nonetheless. And the message of acceptance is a nice one. 

 

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