Three Non-Superhero Comics to Read With Your Kids

I don’t know about you, but one of the things I don’t have any interest in reading about in comic books is… super-heroes. So, of course, I stayed away from comics/graphic novels for the longest time for a few reasons, but mainly because I thought they were all going to be about superheroes. Turns out, luckily, that’s not true at all! So here are three (one from each genre of SF/F/H) non-superhero comics worth checking out with your kiddos. (Pictures lead to Goodreads.)

 

 

Pinky and StinkyPinky and Stinky by James Kochalka

Pinky and Stinky are fat little piglets, but because they’re cuties that doesn’t mean they’re not brave astronauts. Packed with action, adventure, and little cuties.

Color or B/W: Black and White

Violence: Some violence and threats of violence, but very basic stuff with no blood, etc.

Opinion: At first I didn’t think I was going to like Pinky & Stinky, but it grew on me fairly quickly. Definitely one for younger readers, but adults might have fun reading it out loud with their kids. It’s silly and delightful.

Rating: 4 out of 5


Alabaster Shadows.jpgAlabaster Shadows by Matt Gardner and Rashad Doucet

Carter Normandy knows there’s something weird about the neighborhood he and his family move into. Maybe it’s the physics-defying leak in the basement, or the way all the adults seem to look down on kids like they’re scum. With the help of his new friends, Carter discovers a whole other world alongside his seemingly normal community-a world filled with terrifying monsters. A world the adults of the community already know all about. Now it’s up to Carter and his friends to keep these monsters from crossing over into our world, or face the dire consequences!

A gorgeously illustrated mystery perfect for fans of Gravity Falls with just a hint of Lovecraftian horror.

Color or B/W: Color

Violence: Basically none. A small fight with a sea monster that just shows a kid getting wrapped up in a tentacle.

Diversity: Yes, racial.

Opinion: Oh, I loved this one. I could have done a full review on it. (And might in the future.) Beautifully drawn and colored, with an intriguing storyline and interesting characters, Alabaster Shadows is a great pick for middle-grade+ readers.

Rating: 5 out of 5


Princeless.jpg

Princeless by Jeremy Whitley and Mia Goodwin

Still waiting for your prince to come? Tired of spending night after night locked in a secluded tower? Ready for your own adventure? So are we.Princeless is the story of Princess Adrienne, one princess who’s tired of waiting to be rescued. Join Adrienne and her guardian dragon, Sparky, as they begin their own quest in an all-ages action adventure designed specifically for those who are tired of waiting to be rescued… and who are ready to save themselves.

Color or B/W: Color

Violence: Inferred, never witnessed. And typical getting eaten by dragons stuff.

Diversity: Yes, racial.

Opinion: While this probably technically for middle grade+ readers, I would have no problem with (and intend on) reading it with my 8-year-old. Princeless has a sassy, bold main character who is determined to get control of her life and be the hero her sisters need. It’s well-drawn, funny, and well-worth reading.

Rating: 5 out of 5


 

These were all very entertaining reads for various reasons. I’ll definitely be continuing on with two of the series. I do recommend pre-reading them to see if they’re suitable for your particular child. Alabaster Shadows is the one that has a horror tinge to it, but it’s really just a tinge. If you’re wanting to get your child introduced to the Lovecraft mythos, it would be a great way to ease them into it.

Let me know if there are any non-superhero comics you recommend for kids so I can check them out!