This is Sci-Fi, Issue 9: The Circle, Sleight, Walkaway and AI Ships

The banner for the bi-weekly This is Sci-Fi post on Sci-Fi & ScaryThis is Sci-Fi is a sampling of science fiction news across the mediums. From movies to books, to real life, and any bits in between that I can think of to list. This is by no means a comprehensive list of what’s happening, but it should whet your appetite!

This is Sci-Fi’s Quote to Consider

“Anything you dream is fiction, and anything you accomplish is science, the whole history of mankind is nothing but science fiction. ”
― Ray Bradbury

 

Science Fiction Movies

Science Fiction Movie Suggestion of the Week

Movie poster for Alien

Your science fiction movie suggestion of the week is Alien (1979).

Alien Synopsis: After a space merchant vessel perceives an unknown transmission as a distress call, their landing on the source moon finds one of the crew attacked by a mysterious life-form, and soon realize that its life cycle has merely begun.

Starring:  Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt

 

 

 

Science Fiction Movies Opening This Week (April 28th)

Movie cover for The Circle The Circle Synopsis: A woman lands a dream job at a powerful tech company called the Circle, only to uncover a nefarious agenda that will affect the lives of her friends, family and that of humanity.
Starring: Emma Watson, Tom Hanks, John Boyega

Watch the official The Circle trailer.

 

 

 

 

Movie poster for SleightSleight Synopsis: A young street magician (Jacob Latimore) is left to care for his little sister after their parents passing and turns to illegal activities to keep a roof over their heads. When he gets in too deep, his sister is kidnapped and he is forced to use his magic and brilliant mind to save her.

Starring:  Jacob Latimore, Seychelle Gabriel, Dulé Hill

Watch the Sleight official trailer. 

 

 

 


Featured Science Photo

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

This picture just made me stop, stare, and think “Wow.” What about you? Don’t you want to reach out and touch it?


The Sci-Fi Zone: Science Fiction to Science Fact

Sometimes truth can be stranger than fiction. Sometimes the fiction of the past can influence technology of the future. So I’ve gathered up some examples of science fiction and fact. I’m sure at the time these new ideas, creations and technology were thought of as science fiction rather than items that would become the technology of today and commonly used. -Gk

 

1578 – 1605: Submarines in Fiction to Fact

1578: William Bourne designed one of the first prototype submarines. It was designed as a completely enclosed boat to be submerged by hand and rowed under water. There seemed to be little room for crew in the design.

1605: The first actual submersible built was created by Magnus Pegelius.

1726: Computers

The Engine in  Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift was a mechanical information generator. It is generally accepted as the first description of a machine that resembles a computer.

1877: Videophone

An early concept of a videophone and wide-screen television called a ‘telephonoscope’ was conceptualized in popular periodicals of the year.

1881-1888: Time Travel

1881:  The Clock That Went Backward by Edward Page Mitchell features a clock that takes people back in time. It is the first use in a story that features a machine for time travel.

1887: El Anacronopete by Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau predates H.G. Wells’ ‘The Chronic Argonauts’ by 1 year in the use of an actual time machine used to purposely move through time, rather than at random.

1888: The Chronic Argonauts – H.G. Wells – An inventor takes a companion in his time machine. The companion narrates the story of their subsequent adventures. The basis for The Time Machine, written when Wells was a student.

1907: Androids/Humanoid Mechanicals

First introduction of a humanoid mechanical man was Tik-Tok in Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum. Tik-Tok was powered by a trio of clockwork components that controlled his thinking, movement, and speech. None of which he could wind for himself.

1950: Black Holes

One of the first mentions of black holes in fiction occurs in   The Sword of Rhiannon by Leigh Brackett .

  1955: Laser-weapons

In his story, Earthlight, Arthur C. Clarke mentions a particle-beam weapon. They functioned by energy which would be delivered by high-velocity beams of matter. One of the first uses of a laser-like weapon in fiction.

1967: Hover Board

The first mention of a hover board ( a levitating board used for personal transportation) was first described by author M.K. Joseph in his story “The Hole in the Zero“.


Science Fiction Books

New April Science Fiction Releases

Book cover for Forgotten Worlds

Forgotten Worlds Synopsis: The sequel to D. Nolan Clark’s epic space adventure Forsaken Skies.
The battle is over. But the war has only just begun.
Aleister Lanoe has won a stunning victory against the alien armada that threatened Niraya, but it’s not enough to satisfy his desire for vengeance. He won’t rest until he’s located the armada’s homeworld and reduced it to ashes.
Yet his personal vendetta will have to wait. Lanoe now faces a desperate race against time, and the merciless Centrocor corporation, if he’s to secure the Earth’s future – and discover the truth he seeks.

 

 

 


Book cover for Walkaway

Walkaway Synopsis: Hubert Vernon Rudolph Clayton Irving Wilson Alva Anton Jeff Harley Timothy Curtis Cleveland Cecil Ollie Edmund Eli Wiley Marvin Ellis Espinoza—known to his friends as Hubert, Etc—was too old to be at that Communist party.

But after watching the breakdown of modern society, he really has nowhere left to be—except amongst the dregs of disaffected youth who party all night and heap scorn on the sheep they see on the morning commute. After falling in with Natalie, an ultra-rich heiress trying to escape the clutches of her repressive father, the two decide to give up fully on formal society—and walk away.

After all, now that anyone can design and print the basic necessities of life—food, clothing, shelter—from a computer, there seems to be little reason to toil within the system.

It’s still a dangerous world out there, the empty lands wrecked by climate change, dead cities hollowed out by industrial flight, shadows hiding predators animal and human alike. Still, when the initial pioneer walkaways flourish, more people join them. Then the walkaways discover the one thing the ultra-rich have never been able to buy: how to beat death. Now it’s war – a war that will turn the world upside down.


Book cover for Guardians of the Galaxy

Guardians of the Galaxy: Collect Them All Synopsis: We are Groot!

When the Guardians attempt to evacuate a Kree prison planet and end up in a fight for their lives – what else is new? – they discover their old pal Groot is stretched a little thin. Someone is planting stolen branches of the monosyllabic hero and selling the saplings across the galaxy! The search to find Groot’s missing pieces forces the Guardians into an alliance with the unscrupulous Collector, but the real problem is more complicated than he wants them to believe. The seller is a kid. And she’s got more than a few things in common with Gamora -like green skin and a wild temper.

Now with an unruly teen in tow, the Guardians attempt to track down the remaining Groots – and discover an interplanetary conspiracy. War looms on the horizon. It’s a race against the Collector, Groot himself, and the entire Kree armada. It’s battle as Rocket likes it best.

Sit back and watch the destruction as Corinne Duyvis, author of Otherbound and On the Edge of Gone, makes her Marvel debut!


Aiiiiiiiii!! Ships! (Well, AI Ships at least.)

Book cover for Aurora

Book cover for Empire of the Ashes

Book cover for Serengeti

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Science Fiction News on the Web

Witch City: Cardinal Review

At sixteen Peter Cardinal’s family was slaughtered by vampires, but his story is dismissed as the ramblings of a traumatized teen. Wracked by guilt and driven by fury, Peter sets his sights on a career in law enforcement.

His adoptive father, however, is the only one who will listen – and he has other plans for Peter.

After college Peter is recruited by The Program – a law enforcement agency tasked with tracking down and destroying monsters at all costs. At first out for vengeance, Peter understands something bigger and more sinister is in the works. He’s one of the few who can see it. And he may be the only one who can stop it.

This book follows Peter’s story from the death of his parents through his transformation to Program agent to his first case in a world going insane.

Keep Reading!

Saga Vol 2 Review (SFF Graphic Novel)

Book cover for Saga Vol 2Saga Vol 2: From award-winning writer Brian K. Vaughan (Pride of Baghdad, Ex Machina) and critically acclaimed artist Fiona Staples (Mystery Society, Done to Death), Saga is the sweeping tale of one young family fighting to find their place in the universe. Thanks to her star-crossed parents Marko and Alana, newborn baby Hazel has already survived lethal assassins, rampaging armies, and horrific monsters, but in the cold vastness of outer space, the little girl encounters her strangest adventure yet… grandparents. – Goodreads

Collecting: Saga 7-12

 

 

 


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War of the Worlds: Retaliation Review

Book cover for War of the Worlds: RetaliationWar of the Worlds: Retaliation

1898: Martian tripods lay waste to Earth’s cities. The world’s armies are unable to stem the tide of destruction. When all hope appears lost, common bacteria kills the alien invaders. From the ashes, the human race uses the technology left behind by the Martians to build new, advanced weapons.

1924: Armed with their own spaceships, tripods, and jet fighters, the nations of the world are ready to take the fight to Mars. George Patton, Erwin Rommel, Charles de Gaulle, and Georgy Zhukov lead their troops in battle across the red planet to end the alien menace once and for all. But the Martians have one last, desperate plan to try, and if successful, it could mean the end for all humanity. – Goodreads


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Twilight Zone Tuesday – The Hitch-Hiker

The Hitch-Hiker

Nan Adams – Inger Stevens
The Hitch-Hiker – Leonard Strong
Sailor – Adam Williams
Mechanic – Lew Gallo
Counterman – Russ Bender
Gas Station Man (a.k.a. Mean Old Bastard) – George Mitchell

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Why We Won’t Read Your Book

Sci-Fi & Scary gets a lot of science fiction and horror review submissions. That’s awesome! We love supporting indie authors and we have no plans on stopping anytime soon. We even purchase indie author books independently on Amazon on a regular basis. Just because they look good. Hoooooowwwweeevvveeer, there are some things that make us seriously disinclined to accept your book for review (or get it on our own from Amazon). As this Top Ten Tuesday prompt was “Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly NOT Want To Read A Book” we thought we’d take advantage of it to create a list of our reasons we reject (or consider rejecting) many of the books. This is not limited to indie authors, either! Some of these mistakes have been made by well-known authors and have us groaning.

We aren’t going to name names in this post, and any covers that we use will be quick mock-ups done by us to get the point across. As usual, Top Ten Tuesday is brought to you courtesy of Broke and Bookish.

Why We Won’t Read Your Book


Misspellings on the cover or in the summary on the back
. We rarely see this happen on covers but it does happen. We understand not everyone can hire cover designers, so many choose to make their own covers. If you do – good for you. However, for the love of all things tentacled, please make sure you have someone spell check your cover.  And have at least two or three people read your summary! This one we see errors in all the time, and it’s a bit amazing, quite frankly. Especially on more well-known books.

 

 

 

Incorrect capitalization. Yes, it happens to the best of us. However, sometimes you only have one chance to catch someone’s attention. So you want to make sure that all aspects of your cover are on point, yes? If you can’t manage to keep with at least a consistent capitalization, we’re not going to waste our time reading the blurb/summary.

 

 

 

 

 

Keywords in the title section on Goodreads/Amazon. Right now we’re both at the point where if we see this when we’re looking at your book, we will flat out refuse to get it. This is a stupid practice that needs to stop immediately. Keyword tagging your title is tempting, but just don’t do it.

However, it’s not just in the title section, either. If you shove a bunch of keywords in a row right into where your blurb/summary goes instead of giving a proper summary, or any variation of that, it still doesn’t look good.

 

 

Breaking up a story into multiple parts to cash grab. Obviously, there are exceptions to this rule. Every single one of us can think of series that go past the trilogy stage. But every one of us can also think of cases where it was completely unnecessary, and this often happens with indie authors who will parcel out their story into bite-sized chunks (sometimes larger) and often end them on massive cliffhangers. Sometimes right in the middle of the natural arc of one plotline.

 

 

Listing your book under inappropriate genres to get people to read it. If we see this, especially if we see a decidedly adult book in the children’s section, we will report it. Not gonna lie. If it’s obviously mislisted, neither of us have any problem taking the 2 seconds required to let the appropriate people know.  It’s just shady marketing. It goes without saying that we’re also never going to pick up your book. That one, or any other one we ever see under your name.

 

 

 

Nothing but praise on the back. Look, we think it’s fantastic that other published authors are willing to sing your book’s praises. Really. It’s awesome. However, that doesn’t bloody tell us what your book is about, does it?! We’ve seen this one happening more and more, especially on some big name writer’s books, and it’s enough to make us facepalm. This trend towards including the summary on super tiny type on the inside of the dust jacket has got to stop. Gah.

A second part to this – praise for *another* book from the same author. We don’t care about the praise Sassy Serpents got if we’re trying to find a summary for Withering Witches. You get us?

 

 

 

The attractive woman in a seductive/sexy pose cover. You know the ones. Your book is about a kick-ass female *insert profession* and … well, sex sells, right? So you slap a picture of an attractive female on the cover, give it a title and all that, and call it done.

For me (LG), sex sells if I’m wanting to read romance or erotica. Then, show me the boobs or the ripply abs or whatever other cliche you want to show me. I’m still going to be more interested in the actual stories within, but at least I’m not going to roll my eyes so hard that they threaten to stick pointing straight up and walk straight by your book.

 

 

 

Not paying attention to the site’s notices for reviewing. Especially when they’re clearly listed on the top of the “Request a Review” form. Y’all… YOU ALL. Seriously. I can’t even… Look, I’m going to take a second to rant about this. When a site has it clearly posted that they’re only accepting certain formats, and people continue to send them requests to review alternate formats, it’s bloody infuriating. I’ve gotten to the point where if I’m feeling nice that day, I might respond denying to review your book. Otherwise, I just ignore it.

It’s clearly posted in the widget on the right sidebar that we’re only accepting audiobooks for the science fiction submissions right now. It’s also stated right at the very top (in bold) on the request a review form. The form that everyone has to fill out to submit their books for review. And yet y’all keep sending me requests to review your mobi copies. No. Nope. Not happening. Nu-uh. You blew it.  */end mini-rant from LG*


Okay, that’s not all the reasons why we won’t read your book, but it’s the major ones.

What about you, what stops you from reading certain books?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kong: Skull Island Review

Movie poster for Kong Skull IslandKong: Skull Island Synopsis: A team of scientists explore an uncharted island in the Pacific, venturing into the domain of the mighty Kong, and must fight to escape a primal Eden.

Tagline: Awaken the King

Release Date: 2017-3-10 | Runtime: 1 hr 58 minutes | Coolthulhus Earned: 4

Starring:  Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson

Watch the official Kong: Skull Island trailer.


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The Extinction Parade Vol 1 Review

Book cover for The Extinction Parade Vol 1The Extinction Parade Vol 1: Max Brooks, the best-selling Zombie writer in history, unleashes an all-new horror epic! As humans wage their losing fight versus the hordes of the subdead, a frightening realization sets in with the secretive vampire race: our food is dying off. This is the story of the vampire’s descent into all-out war with the mindless, hungry hordes of the zombie outbreak as humanity tries to survive them all! This collected edition contains the entire first chapter of Extinction Parade (Issues #1-5) and a massive undead cover gallery! – Goodreads


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Indie Zone: Talking with Joe Hempel, Audiobook Narrator

Banner for interview with Joe Hemphel

Picture © Joe Hemphel

Best known for his captivating, rich narration and uncanny ability for pulling listeners into an immersive experience, Joe Hempel has been the driving force behind over 90 audiobooks ranging from Horror, Mystery, and Sci-fi to Romance and Personal Development, and has also been published by Audible Studios, Punch Audio and Listen 2 a Book.

 


Talking with Joe Hempel, Audiobook Narrator

Sci-Fi & Scary: You mentioned when you first reached out to me that horror was your forte in audio books. What about the genre makes you so comfortable with narrating it?

Joe Hempel: You know, it’s kind of funny. I have always been drawn to the darker side of literature. The titles that kept me awake and afraid of the dark.  Something about that genre just felt so real.  I’ve actually got a funny story about my first encounter with the darker side of literature.  I was in 6th grade and I was reading Stephen King’s Cujo.  My teacher noticed that and sent a note home telling my parents that I wasn’t to be reading that stuff for reports and asked if I needed to be in counseling.  She told her to basically go to hell because I was obviously reading books that nobody else was.  And from there it was horror and sci-fi and I loved each and every title!  I think because of that I have a great ability to really get into what the author is saying.  The fact that I don’t have a booming brooding voice actually plays to my advantage because it feels like we’re sitting at a campfire and I’m just telling you an account of true stories and gives that little bit of “realism” to the characters and makes it that much more creepy.

Sci-Fi & Scary: Out of the 90+ books you’ve narrated, which one was your favorite?

Joe Hempel: …that’s a tough one. Hmmm……I’ve got a few because of the different genre’s I’ve narrated, but I’m definitely partial to the Jonathan Shade series.  There’s just something about those characters that I really connect to.  I really “become” Jonathan Shade when I’m in the booth.  I’m really going to miss  him when I finish the series.

Sci-Fi & Scary: What did you do before you became a professional narrator?

Joe Hempel: I’m actually still a TV Engineer full time, but really close to going full time as a voice actor. Insurance reasons keep me there right now.  I also ran a book review site for a few years, which kind of was the catalyst for me to get into narrating audiobooks.

Sci-Fi & Scary: What’s the process for a book getting into your hands for recording?

Joe Hempel:  It’s an easy process. Just shoot me an email at joehempel@voiceofjoey.com, or contact me through ACX, or even my facebook page at www.facebook.com/voiceofjoey.  Once we make contact we discuss due dates, rates, etc, and we go from there!

Sci-Fi & Scary: What’s the hardest accent for you to do?

Joe Hempel: Oh geez…..all of them?? LOL. If you’re talking foreign accents, anything Middle-Eastern is really tough for me.  So is a cockney accent.  I’m working really hard to hone my Brittish, and it’s a heck of a lot better than when I started thanks to a couple of sessions with Dr Dialect himself, PJ Ochlan.

Sci-Fi & Scary: I noticed from your website that you have a home studio. What is that set-up like? (Ie: soundproofed room, basement, do not disturb sign, etc.)

Joe Hempel: Yeah, I built the studio from plans that I bought. It’s not soundproof but it does keep a LOT of noise out.  No home studio is going to be completely soundproof.  I just have my Computer on the outside and a wireless keyboard and mouse inside with the monitor and mic and interface all having cables run through a passthrough in the booth to the outside.  It’s nice and spacious and is comfortable enough to spend long periods of time in.

Sci-Fi & Scary: How many hours a day do you spend narrating books?

Joe Hempel:  Since I’m still working full time, and also have 3 kids, it’s tough to spend long periods in the booth. I try for about 2-2.5 hours a day with about 4-5 on Sunday night taking Saturday off.  I’ve got a very understanding family and I love the fact they allow me to spend so much time in there, and it’s paying off!!

Sci-Fi & Scary: Does your approach for narrating a book vary depending on the genre?

Joe Hempel:  The approach is pretty much the same. You have to get to the bottom of what the author is trying to say.  Get to the truth of the narrative so to speak.  You let the characters guide your acting choices.  Each book does require a read through to get to all of this before you step into the booth to record.

Sci-Fi & Scary: What’s the most popular/best-selling book you’ve narrated?

Joe Hempel:  It’s hard to say because I only get sales info on certain titles that I share royalties with. There are 3 that are neck and neck in those sales.  Two of them are non-fiction and complement each other.  Surviving AI: The Promise and Peril of Artificial Intelligence and  The Economic Singularity: Artificial Intelligence and the Death of Capitalism, both by Calum Chace, and one was a surprise in Year’s Best Hardcore Horror Volume 1 from Comet Press.  I’m excited to work on volume 2 in May.  If I had to guess, I’d say that Game Changer by NYT Best-selling author Douglas E Richards may be the best selling based on the amount of ratings/reviews.

Sci-Fi & Scary: If you could get to record any particular book out there, which one would you love to give your voice to?

Joe Hempel:  Anything by Stephen King.   I’m actually VERY excited to narrate for a horror author that I’ve loved for a very long time in April.  I’ll be lending my voice to The Rising series by horror legend Brian Keene.  He’s a very close 2nd for authors I want to narrate to Stephen King.

Sci-Fi & Scary: Have you ever fallen in love with a series after narrating at least one of the books? Or author at least?

Joe Hempel:  The Jonathan Shade series by Gary Jonas. I am incredibly attached to these characters.  They are my pretend family and Kelly Chan is my pretend girlfriend (don’t tell my fiance).

Sci-Fi & Scary: When you meet people for the first time, what’s their reaction when you tell them what you do for a living?

Joe Hempel: Really?? Neat! How do I do that? I love reading and doing voices would be great! Seriously though, that’s pretty much the reaction.

Sci-Fi & Scary: What was the most emotional book you’ve narrated?

Joe Hempel: Hands down, the Bram Stoker-winning novella Little Dead Red by Mercedes M Yardley.  I cannot put into words how much that story affected me.  It was incredibly tough to get through.  And here’s the kicker……it’s only 90 minutes long!  It made such an impact in such a short amount of time that it was hard to narrate without tears in my eyes.  It’s so visceral, so emotional.  I don’t think I’ll be narrating another like it anytime soon. 


Book cover for The Raven's Daughter

The Raven’s Daughter: After a police shootout where she killed a man, criminologist Maggie Tall Bear Sloan retires from the force to enjoy peace and quiet in rural California. When sets of young twins are murdered in her town, the local sheriff recruits her to solve the gruesome killings.

But to catch a killer, Maggie either accepts her true nature as a “pukkukwerek” – the shapeshifting monster killer of Yurok legend – or more children will die. As the manhunt intensifies and her own family is threatened, Maggie will do whatever it takes to keep them safe. Whether she’s awake or asleep dreaming, Maggie is faced with a difficult choice: embrace her heritage – even if it means turning into myth itself – or deny that heritage and lose everything.

Check out Joe’s work for yourself with his latest narration work on The Raven’s Daughter.

 

Three Non-Superhero Comics to Read With Your Kids

I don’t know about you, but one of the things I don’t have any interest in reading about in comic books is… super-heroes. So, of course, I stayed away from comics/graphic novels for the longest time for a few reasons, but mainly because I thought they were all going to be about superheroes. Turns out, luckily, that’s not true at all! So here are three (one from each genre of SF/F/H) non-superhero comics worth checking out with your kiddos. (Pictures lead to Goodreads.)

 

 

Pinky and StinkyPinky and Stinky by James Kochalka

Pinky and Stinky are fat little piglets, but because they’re cuties that doesn’t mean they’re not brave astronauts. Packed with action, adventure, and little cuties.

Color or B/W: Black and White

Violence: Some violence and threats of violence, but very basic stuff with no blood, etc.

Opinion: At first I didn’t think I was going to like Pinky & Stinky, but it grew on me fairly quickly. Definitely one for younger readers, but adults might have fun reading it out loud with their kids. It’s silly and delightful.

Rating: 4 out of 5


Alabaster Shadows.jpgAlabaster Shadows by Matt Gardner and Rashad Doucet

Carter Normandy knows there’s something weird about the neighborhood he and his family move into. Maybe it’s the physics-defying leak in the basement, or the way all the adults seem to look down on kids like they’re scum. With the help of his new friends, Carter discovers a whole other world alongside his seemingly normal community-a world filled with terrifying monsters. A world the adults of the community already know all about. Now it’s up to Carter and his friends to keep these monsters from crossing over into our world, or face the dire consequences!

A gorgeously illustrated mystery perfect for fans of Gravity Falls with just a hint of Lovecraftian horror.

Color or B/W: Color

Violence: Basically none. A small fight with a sea monster that just shows a kid getting wrapped up in a tentacle.

Diversity: Yes, racial.

Opinion: Oh, I loved this one. I could have done a full review on it. (And might in the future.) Beautifully drawn and colored, with an intriguing storyline and interesting characters, Alabaster Shadows is a great pick for middle-grade+ readers.

Rating: 5 out of 5


Princeless.jpg

Princeless by Jeremy Whitley and Mia Goodwin

Still waiting for your prince to come? Tired of spending night after night locked in a secluded tower? Ready for your own adventure? So are we.Princeless is the story of Princess Adrienne, one princess who’s tired of waiting to be rescued. Join Adrienne and her guardian dragon, Sparky, as they begin their own quest in an all-ages action adventure designed specifically for those who are tired of waiting to be rescued… and who are ready to save themselves.

Color or B/W: Color

Violence: Inferred, never witnessed. And typical getting eaten by dragons stuff.

Diversity: Yes, racial.

Opinion: While this probably technically for middle grade+ readers, I would have no problem with (and intend on) reading it with my 8-year-old. Princeless has a sassy, bold main character who is determined to get control of her life and be the hero her sisters need. It’s well-drawn, funny, and well-worth reading.

Rating: 5 out of 5


 

These were all very entertaining reads for various reasons. I’ll definitely be continuing on with two of the series. I do recommend pre-reading them to see if they’re suitable for your particular child. Alabaster Shadows is the one that has a horror tinge to it, but it’s really just a tinge. If you’re wanting to get your child introduced to the Lovecraft mythos, it would be a great way to ease them into it.

Let me know if there are any non-superhero comics you recommend for kids so I can check them out!

  • I love Audible. Tons of books, fantastic narrators, good prices.